Workshops

2022 Nonprofit Conference & Expo Workshops

 

Technology and Culture Collide: Moving from a donor database to a CRM is more than a data migration

Considering a new database? Maybe your current database focuses on donors and you want to add programs. Maybe you can’t get the reports you need. It’s possible staff are entering information but data is incomplete and inconsistent. Maybe your system is plain old hard to use.

If you're considering a new database, or better yet a CRM platform (customer relationship management), it’s risky to think technology first! Before making a technology selection it is important to look inward and assess your organization’s: 

  • current systems, 
  • goals for new technology, and
  • capacity for managing a new system. 

Join us to hear how Families in Transition managed their move to a new CRM and how Pamela is leveraging that experience in her current role at NH Community Loan Fund. You’ll leave feeling more prepared for your own journey.

Participants will:

  • Learn about the risks of being “technology-first” when embarking on a technology project.
  • Understand how a successful technology project starts with clear goals and well defined processes that account for an organization's culture and capacity.
  • Learn how departmental databases, spreadsheets, email and other stand-alone systems are inefficient.
  • Understand how a centralized data platform can better cultivate relationships with supporters, participants and beneficiaries.
  • Leave with a new perspective and a list of specific action items and questions to help them get started on their journey to a new CRM.

Audience

The ideal participant will be development, program managers, and database managers with any level of experience from any size organization.

Session:
Session 2
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Beth  Saunders and Pamela Hawkes

Beth  Saunders and Pamela Hawkes
Beth Saunders Associates and New Hampshire Community Loan Fund

Make Well-being Work for Your Non-Profit

How we work is shifting. People are more determined than ever to pursue fulfilling careers alongside meaningful personal lives. Today’s employees want growth and challenges – but not at the cost of their health and well-being. Nonprofits have a unique opportunity to incorporate well-being as a business strategy to see returns in productivity, retention, and improved morale.    

Many nonprofit organizations recognize the importance of well-being, but few feel prepared to address this need. Given the reality of resource constraints, coupled with an increasing need for services, it can be easy for the needs of staff to become second to the mission of the organization. How can nonprofits prioritize both workforce well-being and mission? How can the organization’s mission fuel purpose and passion without becoming a path to burnout?     

This session will discuss why nonprofit organizations that have a deliberate approach to well-being can be more successful in building support and trust in the workplace. We will discuss different dimensions of well-being and provide a basic framework for establishing a culture of well-being. This session will describe well-being opportunities and challenges specific to nonprofits and will leave participants with a foundation for understanding how to improve well-being in their organizations. 

Participants will:

  • Learn the difference between a traditional wellness program and an integrated well-being strategy.  
  • Understand how to start building a well-being culture within an organization.   
  • Understand different dimensions of well-being (e.g., physical, mental, social, financial, and career) and how they relate to the workplace.   
  • Use a framework to assess the current well-being approach and identify opportunities for improvement. 

Audience 

The ideal participant will be executive leaders, operations managers, and human resource professionals with any level of experience in small to large-size organizations. 

Session:
Session 4
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Vienna Morrill

Vienna Morrill
BerryDunn

"The Five Tool Fundraiser" & The Importance of Managing Up, Sideways, and Down

Based off of the baseball principle of a five-tool player as one who has speed, arm strength, fielding ability, hitting for average and hitting for power, this presentation applies this metaphor to the fundraising professional and the five tools for being the best philanthropic leader. In fundraising the five tools are being an effective solicitor, manager of ceo/exec team, staff manager, strategist, and volunteer manager.

In fundraising the five tools are being an effective solicitor, manager of ceo/exec team, staff manager, strategist, and volunteer manager. – Could the highlighted portion of the sentence be edited to “CEO/executive leadership team”

By learning these top 5 tools and spending time in group breakouts to dive deeper, attendees will leave equipped with new ways to go about their role, sharpen their weaker tools and leverage their strongest ones.

Participants will:

  • Understand the pitfalls and opportunities of each of the five tools.
  • Increase their understanding through workshopping together and diving deeper into the material through facilitated conversation.

Audience

The ideal participant will be fundraising staff - whether portfolio managers and major gift officers, heads of development, etc. Any size organization is welcome.

Session:
Session 2
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Christina  Moore

Christina  Moore
CCS Fundraising

Recruiting in 2022 - How to Make Impact to Attract and Retain Talent

Toni and Alison will outline and discuss recruiting challenges, post COVID and in a remote environment where state's are now all competing for the same talent. They will share tips on how to improve your social media branding to attract the right talent, detail how to draft job ad's, beefing up benefits and where to find talent. They will discuss the best interviewing techniques, hiring for fit, and creating an onboarding program that WOW's.   During the workshop they will facilitate an interactive interviewing activity.

Participants will:

  • Understand how to use social media to build a strong business brand
  • Understand how to leverage employee feedback to attract new talent 
  • Be able to write job ad's that will peak the interest of the right people 
  • Receive a list of benefits that have little to no cost but are the interest of the current market talent pool 
  • Know where to look for talent, connecting with your community to build a pipeline 
  • Outline elements to have in an onboarding process to give a great first impression to a new hire

Audience

The ideal participant will be professionals whose main job function is recruiting, onboarding, and/or employee benefits across all industries with between 5-50 employees.

Session:
Session 3
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Toni  Runci and Alison  Milioto

Toni  Runci & Alison  Milioto
BlueLion, LLC

What's Your Succession Plan?

This workshop will tackle questions of leadership transition for New Hampshire nonprofits. We are in a high point in the shift in nonprofit leadership, both through well-earned retirements and also other unplanned transition. This panel discussion will present stories and learning from people deep in different stages of this shift -- nonprofit CEO's, executive management, and an expert leadership transition coach and consultant. Beyond the logistics of planning a transition, there are important themes of leading a company through change, growth and innovation. Come to learn and share best practices from the field, and come away with resources to equip your own organization for the future with ideas for succession planning of your own.

Board and staff forming early plans, leaders in the middle of transition themselves, and staff of organizations going through change will all find resources and shared learning to consider in their own succession plans.

Participants will:

  • Be introduced to succession planning examples, stories and lessons learned through personal leadership experience, as well as best practices, research and published guides from national nonprofit experts. 
  • Be able to apply what they learn in this session to NH nonprofit organizations at any stage of leadership transition.

Audience

The ideal participant will be nonprofit management staff and board members of any level experience from all-size organizations.

Session:
Session 4
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Moderator Jen  Hopkins with Panelists Steve Saltzman and Jermaine Moore

Moderator Jen  Hopkins with Panelists Steve Saltzman and Jermaine Moore

Recipe for Designing the Marketing Plan that Sets You Apart from the Crowd

Marketing today is complex and can feel overwhelming, particularly with the budget and staff size of a nonprofit. This workshop gives you a new way to think strategically about your U.S.P. (unique selling proposition) and targeting your priority audiences. We’ll discuss how to focus that never-ending marketing to-do list into a doable plan that produces results.

Participants will:

  • Hear about best practices of nonprofit communications planning and marketing 
  • Gain insight into the Behavioral Public Relations Model to help you with methods for triggering desired behaviors from your most important audiences – including your most important ambassadors, your employees and Board members 
  • Discuss the differences between goals, objectives, strategies and tactics 
  • Start thinking about tactics that drive behavioral results instead of adopting marketing strategies because “everyone else is doing them”
  • Explore the important role of research in enabling you to plan effectively and evaluate your success

Audience

The ideal participant will be anyone interested in the topic from all job types and at any skill level.

Session:
Session 1
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Jayme Simoes and Robin Schell

Jayme  Simoes & Robin  Schell, APR, Fellow PRSA
Louis Karno & Company & Jackson Jackson & Wagner

Branding is Not a Bad Word

Branding is the way your organization authentically shares your story about the work you do and why you do it. We emphatically believe that to be successful in pursuing your mission you must create and communicate messages that clearly describe what you are doing and why others should care.

The complicating factors are that many people are delivering the message (your staff, board, volunteers, beneficiaries, etc.), you are communicating with many different audiences (members, donors, the public, the media, etc.), and well…it is noisy out there so messages are hard to hear!

In this workshop we will go through eight (8) concrete steps to create meaningful and clear messages and then create an action plan for sharing these messages.

Workshop participants will receive tools to take with them such as a how-to create core messages document, branding worksheets, and some recommended articles for learning more about nonprofit branding and marketing.

By the end of the session, participants will feel more confident about what to communicate (and why!) to whom and how to communicate effectively.

Participants will:  

  • Understand and establish your organization’s values and strengths.  
  • Understand and articulate the persona of your organization. 
  • Understand and articulate the personas of your target audiences. 
  • Set objectives for behavior, knowledge and belief changes that are critical for your mission.
  • Understand audience barriers that get in the way of these changes or your organization’s mission, and brainstorm how to overcome these.
  • Craft a differentiated positioning statement that is clear, simple and shows your impact or why. 
  • Create core messages for your organization that communicate this differentiation. 
  • Create a plan for getting key internal stakeholders on board with the messages and determine the best opportunities for delivering the messages to your audiences within a reasonable budget.

Audience

The ideal participant will be those who work in communication, development, programs or in any management role at a nonprofit. Board members and volunteers will also find this workshop helpful and interesting. Organizations of all sizes will benefit from this workshop.

Session:
Session 2
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Elise  Annes, Emily  Boedecker

Elise  Annes & Emily  Boedecker
Momentum Communications

Oh No, I hired Regina George and Biff Tannen: An Employment Lawyer’s Guide to Managing Toxic Employees

Toxic employees affect every employer regardless of size or industry, including employers in the nonprofit space.  Sometimes these employees are an organization’s best performer and most valuable asset, but their disposition sours the entire workplace, which affects productivity across the board.  Managing these employees can be very difficult because their performance is often strong.  Moreover, it may feel like every management approach is a trap for future litigation. 

This program educates employers on the cultural, legal, and performance risks that toxic employees pose on the workplace and how employers can address workplace toxicity while avoiding legal fallout.

Participants will gain a deeper understanding of federal and state employment law and the levers toxic employees often pull to position themselves. Brian will guide participants through this area of the law and employment management with real world examples, dynamic-interactive questions about the law, audience polls, best practice tips (including, what policies to adopt and strategies to employ) and a high energy presentation.

Participants will:

  • Learn about critical elements of employment law.
  • Explore the detriment to workplace culture and values wrought by toxic employees.
  • Gain insight into how to manage these employees (and others) while shoring up legal defenses and improving the working environment generally.

Audience

The ideal participant will be anyone in the HR field or anyone charged with employment management and/or supervision, including and especially board members of nonprofit organizations. 

Session:
Session 2
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Brian  Bouchard

Brian  Bouchard
Sheehan Phinney

50 Hacks to Improve Your Annual Fund

Discover and discuss easy-to-apply techniques you can use to improve your direct mail and email fundraising results. These fifty "hacks" are easy to implement, and are backed by neuroscience, behavioral psychology, A/B testing, the experiences of small and large nonprofits, and the recommendations of the field's biggest experts. You'll leave with a copy of Five Maples' President Gary Henricksen’s booklet of the same name with all the info, research and examples.

Participants will:

  • Be introduced to clear and concise tips.
  • Discover practical applications that can be used right away.

Audience

The ideal participant will be anyone charged with messaging to donors for appeals or impact newsletters, and anyone charged with producing communications for donors. Even very experienced fundraising staff can learn new tricks to improve their fundraising results.

Session:
Session 1
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Sarah  Gnerre, Melissa  Howard

Sarah  Gnerre & Melissa  Howard
Five Maples Development Communications & Granite VNA

Build a Fundraising Board

Every nonprofit organization wants a board that fundraises. But not every board is ready to fundraise. Even when your board members are willing, creating a board fundraising program and supporting your board members in their fundraising may still be an overwhelming program to build.

But you don’t have to recreate the wheel.

This session will talk about the reasons why your board doesn’t fundraise and ways to address them. It will provide tips and ideas for structuring how staff engage, train, coach, and support board members to take their organization’s fundraising to the next level. Attendees will be walked through models and tools they can use to put the pieces in place and build a board engaged in your fundraising, along with a model program and a toolkit to implement it that your organization can use to get started.

Participants will:

  • Gain ideas about how to break through frustration and create a board fundraising program.
  • Understand why a board doesn’t fundraise and the structures needed for the board to be successful.
  • Understand ways to shift board and staff mindset around board fundraising.
  • Be introduced to a board fundraising program model that organizations with an established donor base and a board ready to fundraise can implement.

Audience

The ideal participant will be Executive Directors of established organizations that have a minimum of 200 mid-level donors and who have authority over board recruitment, orientation, and engagement.

Session:
Session 4
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Megan  Amundson

Megan  Amundson
Megan Amundson Consulting

Empathy & Effectiveness: Engaging with the LGBTQ+ Community for Nonprofits

Without specialized diversity, equity, and inclusion training, most nonprofits have gaps in their cultural competency around the LGBTQ+ community.  This issue is timely and critical for nonprofits. 

Recent studies show that, although LGBTQ+ individuals seem to be well-represented within nonprofit staff, board membership, and leadership, LGBTQ+ staff members, for example, report discrimination and even fear of coming out of the closet. 

In this interactive workshop, participants will learn best practices for effectively engaging with the LGBTQ+ community, including the transgender community, while also gaining a greater sense of empathy for the LGBTQ+ experience. 

Participants will solidify their foundational knowledge of terminology and key concepts regarding sexual orientation and gender identity.  With opportunities for questions woven throughout the workshop, learners will have the opportunity to pose questions they may have always wondered about, but never had a forum in which to ask. 

Learners will leave with an ability to bring about positive, LGBTQ+ affirming change in the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of their organization.

Participants will:

  • Define key terminology and foundational concepts regarding the LGBTQ+ community, sexual orientation, and gender identity.
  • Better empathize with the LGBTQ+ experience.          
  • Utilize up-to-date best practices, around language, behavior, and environmental elements, to drive more effective interactions with the LGBTQ+ community, both from an internal and a constituent-facing perspective.       
  • Identify tools and techniques that can be put to immediate use, for making their organization more LGBTQ+ affirming in attitude and behavior.
  • Describe the current status of the LGBTQ+ community in the nonprofit world and avenues to positive change which learners can implement.

Audience

The ideal participant will be staff, leadership, and board members of any skill level and any organization size.  Anyone involved in the nonprofit sector, regardless of position, can benefit from becoming more culturally competent around the LGBTQ+ community.  All can play a role in creating more inclusive and equitable environments amongst nonprofit organizations.

Session:
Session 1
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Rebecca Sanborn

Rebecca Sanborn, J.D.
Sanborn Corporate Training Solutions

The Non-Technical Nonprofit Manager’s Guide to Preventing Ransomware and Cyber Insecurity

Every day we hear of an organization that’s in the headlines because of a major security breach. Sometimes it’s a nonprofit themselves, and sometimes it’s an organization like Blackbaud that hosts data for those nonprofits. How should a nonprofit manager respond to this ever-present threat?

For too long, the assumption has been that nonprofit managers simply have to trust that IT is doing what they should to take care of these risks. However, countless security breaches have proven out that nonprofit managers themselves need to be lead risk management with IT simply being one resource leveraged along the way. 

As such, the goal of this session will be to help equip nonprofit managers with some of the key principles they need to understand in order to prevent ransomware and cyber insecurity, regardless of how technically savvy they are, as well as provide key action items and immediate steps to make progress. 

Participants will:

  • Learn the proper partnership between organization leaders and IT
  • Learn key principles for overseeing IT and cybersecurity, regardless of technical savviness
  • Understand how to uncover and identify the most significant potential threats for their organization
  • Learn methods to increase your team’s security and awareness 
  • Learn about resources in the marketplace for cybersecurity support (and how to avoid scare-tactics promoting limited solutions)

Audience

The ideal participant will be business, finance, and operations leaders with high-level oversight of technology or IT. and nonprofit leaders at any size organization seeking guidance on managing risk to their organization.

Session:
Session 1
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Ryan  Robinson

Ryan  Robinson
Mainstay Technologies

Leadership: Creating the Conditions for Success

Leading a nonprofit - whether as the chief executive or as a board trustee -  is a highly nuanced and strategic art form. It is like no other leadership position. What makes this model so unique is that the paid professional CEO is overseen by a volunteer board made up of leaders from all walks of life that rotate regularly on and off the board.

While the model fosters a diversity of viewpoints around the board table, it also results in frequent transitions.  High performing board-executive leadership teams must put in motion a variety of “conditions”  that will drive mission and financial success as the organization journeys through each life-cycle stage and transition.

During this workshop we will explore strategies the board and the chief executive can implement to build a highly adaptive nonprofit business.

The goal of the workshop is to provide those leading nonprofits with an understanding of why some nonprofit leaders excel at creating the conditions that lead to success.

Participants will:

  • Explore conditions for success and leave with deeper clarity about how they can be more effective and strategic leaders. 
  • Be provided with a new frame and a variety to tools to foster effective leaders on every level of the organization

Audience

The ideal participant will be senior leaders and board members of any size organization.

Session:
Session 1
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Mary Ellen Jackson

Mary Ellen Jackson
Mary Ellen Jackson Consulting

The Role of Managing Oneself in Organizational Leadership

Organizational leaders have an enormous impact on the functioning and the culture of their organizations based on how they manage up (board relations), down (staff supervision), and especially, how they manage their own time, relationships, and emotional processes at work. This workshop provides frameworks and an opportunity to explore ways that high-functioning leaders manage themselves, and to identify next steps in one's own professional development.

Participants will: 

  • Review a framework for thinking about management skills including managing self, based in Bowen family/organizational systems work. 
  • Hear and share stories and examples of high-functioning leaders and key behavioral characteristics. 
  • Discuss their own relationship to a list of high-functioning leadership characteristics. 
  • Identify a personally relevant area for experimentation and improvement in self-management.

Audience

The ideal participant will be executive directors and other nonprofit executive staff fin organizations of all sizes.  Nonprofit board members may also be interested.

Session:
Session 4
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Stephanie Lahar

Stephanie Lahar
Biz card

Leadership, Culture and Strategic Planning: A Formula For Success

Strategic planning can have a bad rap: 

  • "The process is too long and resource intensive."
  • "By the time the plan is developed it is out of date and no one ever acts on it."

Leadership, a performance-based culture, and an innovative strategic planning process can create a plan that motivated employees are excited to implement and iterate.   In this workshop the presenters will share both a proven consulting process and real-life organizational framework that has proven results. 

Participants will:

  • Gain insight into : 
    • Critical components of a solid strategic planning process. 
    • How to gain buy-in at every level of an organization. 
    • The importance of metrics and individual accountability. 
    • How to create a strategic organization through culture 
    • Empowering your management team. 
    • The importance of having a dynamic plan.
  • Understand key process steps for gathering information on which to develop a plan.
  • Take away templates for metric dashboards and workplans.

Audience

The ideal participant will be organizational leaders (executives, board members) with any level of experience from small to large organizations.

Session:
Session 3
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Julie  Reynolds and Ellen  McCahon

Julie  Reynolds & Ellen  McCahon
Cornerstone VNA & Helms & Co., Inc.

Better Together: The Board Chair & CEO Team

One of the single most important factors in determining a nonprofit's success is the relationship between the CEO and Board Chair. Building this partnership begins with aligning the relationship, establishing role clarity and focus, and communicating effectively.

When the CEO and Board Chair become a unified team, they have the ability to think beyond traditional governance when building an engaged board, enhancing collaboration, and focusing on powerful strategy design and execution.

In order to shape a highly effective Governing Board, CEOs & Board Chairs will collaboratively:

  • Align organizational understanding as a foundation for growth.  
  • Establish clearly defined roles. 
  • Shape Board focus & meeting agendas.
  • Establish strategies for improved communication.

Attendees will leave this session unified and prepared to lead their board and organization toward long-term success.

Participants will:

  • Recognize and lead through the clearly defined roles of CEO / Executive Director & Board Chair.
  • Apply key strategies in relationship building and in conducting meetings that are more focused and effective.

Audience

The ideal participant will be Executive Directors, CEOs, and Board Chairs with any level of experience from small to large organizations.

Session:
Session 2
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Eric  Curtis and Toral  Cowieson

Eric  Curtis & Toral  Cowieson
Curtis Strategy

A Board’s Role in Igniting Performance Through Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion

The  Council of Nonprofits defines a Board’s responsibility being “to steer the organization towards a sustainable future by adopting sound, ethical, and legal governance and financial management policies, as well as by making sure the nonprofit has adequate resources to advance its mission.” Research from McKinsey, PWC, and others show that organizations that have diversity in their leadership are more likely to outperform their peers. Yet, it is more than just diversity of people that makes an organization perform at its best. 

This session will explore how Boards can ignite the performance of their organizations through embracing diversity, equity, and inclusion for themselves and their organizations.

Participants will: 

  • Understand how diversity, equity, and inclusion can impact your Board; 
  • Understand how your Board can ensure your organization’s leadership, structure, and programming is equitable and inclusive; 
  • Have actionable ideas for improving your organization’s performance.

Audience

The ideal participant will be board members and senior leadership of any nonprofit of any size who are interested in increasing the reach and performance of their organization.

Session:
Session 3
 

Presenter Bio(s)

James T. McKim Jr.

James T. McKim, Jr.
Organizational Ignition, LLC

Words Matter: Advancing an Asset-Based Approach to Organizational Communication

How we describe the people we work with or provide services for, and the communities in which they live matters. When we use words like "at-risk," "vulnerable," or "dual-eligibles," we reduce people and places to their greatest weaknesses and reinforce deeply held stereotypes that maintain inequity and injustice. Additionally, this can portray people and places less like a partner and more like an object of our charity. We can counter deficit-focused ideas with communications that highlight the strengths of populations and the assets in their communities to solve problems.

This workshop will share key ideas regarding asset-based language and effective framing strategies and provide participants with concrete ways to advance an asset-based approach in their organizational communication. Agency newsletters, fundraising appeal letters, web content, and grant proposals are types of communication that will be addressed. The presenters will offer case examples from nonprofit organizations who are successfully using these strategies.

The presenters will offer case examples from nonprofit organizations who changed their communication. Participants will work in small groups to practice reframing deficit-based messages to asset-based messages. They will bring home helpful tips to advance effective framing in their work.

Participants will:

  • Be able to identify the difference between asset-based and deficit-based language.
  • Be able to apply effective framing strategies to their written and/or oral communication and name at least one step they will take to apply what they have learned.

Audience

The ideal participant will be any person who communicates (written or verbally) on behalf of a nonprofit organization and has any level of experience.

Session:
Session 3
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Kelly  Laflamme and Keliane  Totten

Kelly  Laflamme, MPA & Keliane  Totten, M.Ed., MCHES
Pear Associates

Financial Literacy for Nonprofit Boards

We know you are passionate about your nonprofit. Board members, management, and staff often join nonprofits because they are passionate about the organization’s mission. Then, they find out that their responsibilities include understanding the financial statements so they can help make informed mission-driven decisions.

It’s easy to rely on the one board member who has the financial expertise to “take care of” and understand the financial statements. But, to be financially healthy and sustainable, an organization needs to ensure all board members take ownership and responsibility for the fiscal health of the organization.

Don’t let the financials intimidate you. Help board members increase their financial literacy by learning the basics of financial management.

The goal of the workshop is to make the financial aspect of a nonprofit organization less daunting for non-finance professionals (board members and staff). Attend this presentation to lose your fear of financial statements and gain skills to add to the long-term financial well-being of your organization.

Participants will:

  • Gain knowledge of key concepts related to understanding financial statements, internal controls and their fiduciary duties as it relates to the finances of an organization.
  • Leave with an understanding of questions they should be asking the organization, team members, and/or external resources such as their accountant.
  • Gain insight on how to evaluate the responses to those questions.
  • Gain skills to help them contribute to the financial health of the organizations they are involved with.

Audience

The ideal participant will be someone who got involved in a nonprofit because they care passionately about the mission. They now realize they need a better understanding of the finances and related fiduciary responsibilities to be a more effective board or staff member.

Session:
Session 1
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Ryan  Maran & Abby  Lamothe

Ryan  Maran & Abby  Lamothe
Leone, McDonnell & Roberts, PA

Dashboards - What They Are and How To Build One Your Board Will Love

Like the dashboard of a car, financial and program dashboards can help communicate information about the status of an organization quickly, visually, and in an manner that is easily understood to a chosen audience.

Dashboards can help boards and staff of nonprofits get a handle on large amounts of data and see the significance of the data quickly. Dashboards can also be shared with donors and grantmakers to help familiarize them with a nonprofit’s impact, scope of programs, or finances. 

An effective dashboard illustrates rather than tells the audience about needed actions or decisions.  

In this interactive workshop, through exercises and examples, participants will learn about the process of developing a dashboard, identify which audience they wish to target, and what information might be most appropriate for their chosen audience, whether it is the Board, funders, or internal stakeholders.

Participants will:

  • Understand what a dashboard is in the context of a nonprofit organization. 
  • Identify desired audience for a dashboard. 
  • Understand the steps and ideal stakeholders involved in identifying key indicators that should be included in the dashboard. 
  • Leave the workshop with key stakeholders identified, several dashboard templates and an action plan for developing a new or modifyin an existing dashboard for their agency.

Audience

The ideal participant will be executive leadership, board members, senior program or finance staff.

Session:
Session 3
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Liz  Chipman

Liz  Chipman
Capital CFO LLC

Stop Worrying About IT: Planning for your Organization

Decisions you make on your IT today will have a significant impact on how smoothly your organization operates in the years ahead. How do you ensure you're set up for success and avoid frustrated staff and costly, unnecessary triaging and remediation projects? In this workshop, we'll walk you through key technologies and approaches to save you and your organization serious tech headaches down the road. Join us to learn more about how your organization can truly have technology that "just works".

Participants will:

  • Walk away with an understanding of key IT topics relevant to organizations of any size.
  • Be equipped with prompting questions to assist in discovering IT issues in your organization.
  • Learn about recommended strategies for addressing the most common IT problems.

Audience

The ideal participant will be organization staff in IT or Operations roles in small to mid-sized organizations.

Session:
Session 4
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Eric  Whitney and Jami  Wiegand

Eric  Whitney & Jami  Wiegand
Insource Services, Inc.

Stewardship! Don't Overlook This Important Step with Your Donors!

Identify --> Cultivate---> Ask---> Thank--->. What comes next? After thanking your donors are you remembering the important next step of stewardship?

In the race to land the next donor, are you forgetting to take care of the ones you already have? This workshop will focus on the important fifth step in the donation cycle --STEWARDSHIP -- with concrete ways to help even the shyest development staff person or board member gain the skills needed to care for your donors and their gifts.

This will be an informal, technology-free session with lots of conversation and maybe even some role playing.  Bring your stewardship questions and be ready to have some fun!

Participants will:

  • Be able to define what stewardship means for their organization(s).
  • Be able to identify easy, low or no-cost ways to serve as good stewards to their donors’ philanthropy.

Audience

The ideal participant will be board members and staff involved in development activities.  This workshop is suitable for all development staff members but perhaps best suited for beginners or those with small shops.

Session:
Session 3
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Katie  Collins

Katie  Collins
Capitol Center for the Arts 

How to: Navigate digital advertising options

It’s impossible to open your laptop or turn on your phone these days without being served various forms of digital advertising. From Google Adwords to social advertising to programmatic, pre-roll, retargeting, native ads and sponsored content...the options, the terminology and the costs can be difficult to navigate. On top of that, the technology is changing nearly every day, making a murky space almost impossible to keep up with. This session will:

  • Provide a brief glossary of the terms relevant to digital advertising.
  • Discuss whether digital ads are the right choice for branding vs. lead generation.
  • Provide tips and checklists for developing a simple, cost-effective campaign to maximize an entry-level budget.

Participants will:

  • Be introduced to the ad platforms available to organizations that wish to handle digital advertising in-house/DIY. 
  • Learn how to work with a media outlet or ad agency that handles digital advertising.  
  • Learn how display ads, videos and other ad content are served to audiences on digital platforms.  
  • Understand the difference between a lead generation campaign and a brand awareness campaign.  
  • Learn how to map out a digital ad campaign, from creative concept to launch.  
  • Be able to set a realistic digital ad budget.

Audience

This ideal participant will be a professional responsible for their organization's brand visibility and/or marketing and advertising. From entry level professionals who might handle social media to senior-level EDs or Development Directors responsible for hiring staff to perform this function, this session will help a diverse mix of professionals understand digital advertising options.

Session:
Session 4
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Marnie  Grumbach and  Emily  Broadbent

Marnie  Grumbach & Emily  Broadbent
Fluent IMC

How Fiscal Sponsorship Can Revolutionize Equity, Inclusion, and Impact in the Nonprofit Sector

Fiscal sponsorship is enjoying an era of growing interest, expansion, and field maturation as the national conversation around impact in the nonprofit sector fuels interest in restructuring for greater efficiency and capacity. Our nation's ongoing reckoning with race and class inequities has fueled extraordinary growth in the number of new grassroots initiatives throughout the country, including NH. Likewise, the pandemic has brought diverse new funding sources to the table requiring platforms for disbursement and administration. All this important work requires turnkey access to 501(c)(3) status and back-office infrastructure that well-built nonprofit fiscal sponsors can deliver on. 

Participants will:

  • Understand the fundamentals of how fiscal sponsors work, and how they relate to the missions they support. 
  • Understand how fiscal sponsorship can provide more equitable access to nonprofit resources for historically marginalized groups. 
  • Understand how fiscal sponsorship can be a model for collective capacity building and impact for the sector.  
  • Walk away with templates for developing roles and responsibilities matrix for running an fiscal sponsorship program, and a fiscal sponsorship agreement  with robust guidance for nonprofits interested in creating well-designed fiscal sponsorship agreements to memorialize these relationships.

Audience

Ideal participants will be emerging and seasoned nonprofit professionals and funders interested in current trends in fiscal sponsorship and nonprofit resource sharing.

Session:
Session 2
 

Presenter Bio(s)

Josh Sattely and Asta Pekviciute

Josh Sattely & Asta Petkeviciute
Social Impact Commons

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